Writing in different forms (with your peers)

Daily Prompt

WN #44: Inspired by Quotes

quote

Inspired by this quote image, beginning writing a fictional story.  Write for ten minutes. Please note you will be sharing this with your peers.

We’re going to play with form again, but this time, we’re going to swap notebooks so you can capture the writing voices of your peers in your notebooks.

Start by swapping notebooks with someone at a different table.

 

Read your peer’s daily response prompt.  Continue where they left off in play form.

Write for eight minutes.

 

Trade notebooks with someone at a different table.  Read the entire daily prompt.

Continue where they left off in poetic form (any style you like).

Write for eight minutes.

 

Trade notebooks with someone at a different table.  Read the entire daily prompt.

Continue where they left off in screenplay form.

Write for eight minutes.

 

Return the notebook to its original owner.

 

Read your entire daily prompt.  You should now have:

*your original short story
*a peer’s play script
*a peer’s poetry
* a peer’s screenplay

What do you notice about your peers’ style and voice?  Can you define it in a word or phrase?  How do their writing voices compare to your own?

Have a fantastic Thanksgiving break and make sure to read a good book and keep writing!  🙂

Writing in different forms

Daily Prompt

WN #43: Writing from an Image

girl-abstract-art-hd-wallpaper
Photo Credit: freehdwalls.net

Inspired by this image, write for five minutes.

Today, we’re going to experiment with different forms of writing, paying particular attention to how the form affects the meaning of your work.

You’ve had a chance to brainstorm with the image above.  If you like what you have, feel free to continue working with it.  If not, continue with something entirely new.

Begin writing it in play format.

Write for eight minutes.

 

Continue writing, but now in the form of a short story.

Write for eight minutes.

 

Continue writing, but now in the form of a poem (any form you like).

Write for eight minutes.

 

Continue writing, but now in the form of a screenplay.

Write for eight minutes.

 

Re-read your writing from today.

What form seems to work best for this particular idea, and why?

Always consider form whenever you get an idea for writing.  It can take you all new directions.

Read each other’s blogs!

Hi class!  No posts are due today (unless you didn’t submit your book review yet).

As always though, you should be posting something on your blog about once a week.

What I strongly encourage all of you to do today is explore each other’s blogs and post some comments on them.  Check out class book reviews page as well so you can read each other’s reviews and post feedback.

Happy writing and reading and have a wonderful weekend!

Workshop Day: Playwriting (Day Four)

Daily Prompt

WN #42: Writing from an Image

absurd set

This is an actual set for a play.  What do you imagine the script would be like for a play like this?  Freewrite for ten minutes, exploring your thoughts and ideas about this set.

The end of the marking period is…tomorrow!

I need all of you to rate yourselves on your participation.  Take out your Progress Tracker Packets and fill out the section about participation for marking period 2.  Turn those into me today so I can review them and input the grades.

As always, be honest (with me, and with yourself).

Now, while I am conferencing with students individually, these are your options:

* work on writing your own ten-minute play (write something entirely new or take a piece you’ve already written and convert it)

* work on a post for your blog (remember to post your book review if you haven’t yet)

* read a great book

* help a fellow writer with his/her writing

Okay, happy writing/reading!

 

Playwriting (Day Three)

Daily Prompt

WN #41: The Worst Day Ever

Imagine what would constitute the “worst day ever” for you and write about it.  You pick the genre: comedic, dramatic, etc…

Write for ten minutes.

Today, I want to bring to your attention a local playwriting contest which I urge you to consider submitting to.  Remember, you all need to submit to a space “beyond the classroom walls” before the end of the semester.

Let’s read another ten-minute play together called, “Clothes for their Souls.”

What questions do you have about writing a play as you move forward?

Use this time now to write some more of your ten-minute play!

 

Workshop Day: Playwriting (Day Two)

Daily Prompt

WN #40: Writing from a List

Make a list of moments from your own life which could be interesting to see onstage.

Write for five minutes.

Let’s continue yesterday’s discussion about plays.  Today, we’re going to specifically focus on structure.

For those interested, I have another 10-minute sample script for one actress called, “The Serpent’s Tale.”

Now, while I am conferencing with students individually, these are your options:

* work on writing your own ten-minute play (write something entirely new or take a piece you’ve already written and convert it)

* work on a post for your blog (remember to post your book review if you haven’t yet)

* read a great book

* help a fellow writer with his/her writing

Okay, happy writing/reading!

 

Playwriting: Day One

Daily Prompt

WN #39: Writing from a Word

The word is: CLOUD.

Inspired by this word, write for ten minutes.

This week, we’re going to focus on playwriting.  To do so, we’re going to study “ten-minute plays.”  

Let’s read one together called, “The Chocolate Affair.”

What do you notice a script has?

Take out the screenplays from a couple of weeks ago.

What do you notice are the similarities and differences between scripts for the stage and scripts for the screen?

Let’s generate a list of ideas and determine which category they would be best for: screen or stage.

So how does one write a ten-minute plays?  Here’s some words of advice.

 

 

Where (and how) to post your book reviews

Hi folks!  Today is the day to post your book reviews.

To do so, go to our class paged titled, Book Reviews.

In the comments, add a link to your blog post containing your book review. The following info should also be in the comments:

title of the book
author
favorite quote of yours from the book

When you get a chance, I encourage all of you to read each other’s reviews and post feedback.

Happy writing and reading!

Writing a Book Review: Day Three

Daily Prompt

WN #38: Lifting a Line

Select a random line from your notebook and make it the first line of a new piece.

Write for ten minutes.

It’s time to continue working on book reviews.

Today, we’re going to look at revision guidelines.

Use the remainder of the hour to write and revise your reviews while I conference with those I missed last week.  It’s a good idea to have a peer review what you’ve written so far.

Happy Writing!