NaNoWriMo: Day 27 (Lists, Lists, and Lists of Lists)

DP #39: Lists

Read pages 69-70 in your workbooks about lists. Pick one list from page 70 to write as your daily prompt.

Take ten minutes.

 

Next, I’d like to share today’s “Featured Novelists” and our final NaNoWriMo pep talk of the day. Today’s author is Tamora Pierce.

Today is the LAST day to earn points for workbook activities. In case you missed some, here is a list of all of them.

Here’s a refresher on what you should complete for points:

  1. Character Questionnaire (pgs. 12-14)
  2. Conflict Handout (pgs. 16-18)
  3. Storyboard or Six Tasks for Plot (pg. 26)
  4. Plot Rollercoaster (pg. 28)
  5. Beginnings: four ways to begin your novel (pgs. 50-52)
  6. Setting that enhances a character (pgs. 31-33)
  7. Setting that enhances mood in a particular scene (pgs. 36-37)
  8. Subplotting (pg. 54)

You have the hour to keep working on these activities and keep writing your novel. Remember that the next three days in class we will meet in the lab so you can type, type, type away!

 

NaNoWriMo: Day 26 (Details, Details, Details)

DP #38: Details (to get readers hooked!)

Write a paragraph (incorporating the seven types of imagery) that describes an exciting moment in your novel. Consider this a paragraph that you would share with potential publishers as an example of what makes your book so special.

Take ten minutes.

 

Next, I’d like to share today’s “Featured Novelists” and our NaNoWriMo pep talk of the day. Today’s author is Sharon G. Flake.

Read page 55 of your workbook about the importance of details. The pages that follow have word banks that can help supply you with a larger vocabulary as you write.  You do not need to do the activities that follow (unless you are experiencing writer’s block and you think it may help).

Use the remainder of the hour to work on your novels!

NaNoWriMo Day 20: Type away (shoot for 75%!)

Use this class period to type as much as you possibly can (shooting for 75% by the end of the day – or week if you plan on working on it over break).

If you are NOT typing directly on the NaNoWriMo YWP site, make sure you copy and paste onto that site before you leave class. That way, we can have an accurate word count for you individually and for our entire class.

Let’s go!

NaNoWriMo: Day 19 (Writer Emergency Pack!)

DP #37: How’s it going?

Reflect on your novel and word count goal. How are you feeling? What do you need to do to get the novel done?

Take five minutes. Be prepared to share.

 

Next, I’d like to share today’s “Featured Novelist” and our NaNoWriMo pep talk of the day. Today’s author is Roxanne Gay.

 

Time to review our class word counts and award some more winners for completing the milestones of 25%, 50%, and 75%!

 

Today,  you are going to work with a “Writer Emergency Pack.” Move now so we have four groups of roughly the same size.

 

Next, each group will be given a deck of cards (the Writer Emergency Pack). Open them and spread the cards out in the middle of the tables.

Each card contains ideas for ways to add to your novels. Your task is to use these cards as a novel-saving tool, to fight against writer’s block, and build your word count!

Here are the possible ways to use them:

  1. Draw four at random and try to accomplish as many tasks as you can before the end of the hour.
  2. Look through the cards and select one that you feel really applies to your novel and focus only on that.
  3. Share a card(s) with someone else at the table, apply it to your individual novels, then share your results with each other at the end.
  4. Any combo of the above activities (or your own idea!)

In other words, use these cards in a way that will help you and have fun!  🙂

NaNoWriMo: Day 14 (Plot Development)

DP #36: Point of View

Try writing a piece of your novel from the perspective of someone (or something) other than your protagonist. For example, tell it from a secondary’s perspective, the antagonist’s, or a tree! You may like it so much, you decide to keep it!

Take ten minutes.

 

Next, I’d like to share today’s “Featured Novelist” and our NaNoWriMo pep talk of the day. Today’s author is Roxanne Gay.

Today, let’s talk about subplotting. Open up your workbooks to page 53-54 which provides on an overview.

On page 54, there is a bonus exercise. It asks you to create an antagonist for a secondary character as a way to build conflict for a subplot.  On the bottom of the page, write out your ideas for this. This could look like a list, an outline, or an actual scene written out. Whatever you prefer.  When you are done, show it to me for points.

Happy writing!

 

NaNoWriMo: Day 13 (Setting and Dialogue)

DP #35: Dialogue

Take a look at pages 38-41 in your workbooks. It explains three things dialogue should do:

  • reveal characters’ relationships to one another
  • move the story forward
  • increase the tension

On page 41, pick one of the six scenarios listed and write about it. You can later transfer it into your novel.  I have a supplemental handout for you as well to ensure you format your dialogue correctly.

Take ten minutes.

 

Next, I’d like to share today’s “Featured Novelist” and our NaNoWriMo pep talk of the day. Today’s author is Neil Gaiman.

 

For today’s main activity, we are going to work SETTING.

First, let’s focus on the setting for your novel. Many of your novels probably have more than one.

Let’s take a look at page 30 in your workbooks together.

On page 31, it asks you to describe settings that would enhance characters, including those in your novel. Pick ONE to write a setting for and write a brief description of it with a partner. This exercise is really asking you to use imagery in your writing. Did you know there actually seven types of imagery? Try incorporating as many of these as you can in your setting description. Be prepared to share.

Now look at pages 32-33. Pick one (or more) of your characters and write a setting that enhances their character. Show this to me for points.

Now let’s look at how setting can enhance mood. Let’s look at pg 34 together and develop some settings for these moods as a group.

On pages 36-37, write down the mood you are trying to create for each of the five parts of your novel. Next, describe the setting in those parts that will help create that mood. Remember to use the seven types of imagery as you do. Show this to me for points. 

 

Recap:

This is what you need to show me to earn points.

  • Pgs 32-33: Pick one (or more) of your characters and write a setting that enhances their character.
  • Pgs. 36-37: Write down the mood and describe the setting for the five main parts of your novel.

Happy writing!

 

NaNoWriMo: Day 12 (Beginnings)

DP #34:   Dare Machine

Let’s check out someone’s “Dare” today and give it a go! Who knows? You may decide to incorporate this into your novel!

Take five minutes.

 

Next, I’d like to share today’s “Featured Novelist” and our NaNoWriMo pep talk of the day. Today’s author is Lois Lowry.

 

Time to review our class word counts and award some more winners for the first challenge: reaching 25% and the second challenge: reaching 50%!

 

Today’s focus is on writing the beginning of your novel. Many of you have probably already written one (and it’s okay if you haven’t!).

Take a look at pages 49-52 in your workbooks. As you can see, there are essentially four ways to start your novel:

  • at the beginning
  • at the inciting incident (the first sign of conflict)
  • in medias res (in the middle of things)
  • at the end

Try writing the beginning of your novel each of these four ways (your workbook gives you some room). When you’re done, show me for points and then choose one to type onto your novel on NaNoWriMo!

*Note: if you’ve already typed the beginning of your novel on your site, you don’t have to hand write it again. Instead, just try writing out the other three ways to begin your novel. You may end up liking one of them better!

Happy writing!