Day #22: Abecedarian

DP #37: Dear Poet #5

Today, we’re going to watch and listen to an eminent American poet recite original poetry. Be prepared to write down your reactions after listening, as well as discuss.

You’ll be listening to eight poets over the course of the next two weeks and writing a letter to one of them.

 

Today, you’re going to try your hand at writing an Abecedarian poem.  These poems use the alphabet to start every line.  Here’s one I wrote.  

Once you craft one you like, transfer it into your poem book.

Happy writing!

Please use this link to vote on what we will do for our next unit.

Day #18: Phone Number Poem and Poem-in-Your-Pocket Day

DP #36: Dear Poet #4

Today, we’re going to watch and listen to an eminent American poet recite original poetry. Be prepared to write down your reactions after listening, as well as discuss.

You’ll be listening to eight poets over the course of the next two weeks and writing a letter to one of them.

 

Today, you’re going to create a poem using your own phone number as a template for the amount of syllables per line.

Once you craft one you like, transfer it into your poem book. For fun, you can “give your phone number” to someone and see if they can figure it out by counting out the syllables.

 

Today is also National Poem-in-your-pocket day. In celebration, I’m giving each of you the gift of a poem. Read it and reflect on it and then (if you’re willing) fold it and place it in your pocket with the knowledge that thousands of other people today are carrying the beauty of the written word with them as well. You may also choose to give it someone else who may appreciate it. You can also have some fun turning it into a beautiful piece of origami.

Day #17: Cinquain

DP #33: Dear Poet #3

Today, we’re going to watch and listen to an eminent American poet recite original poetry. Be prepared to write down your reactions after listening, as well as discuss.

You’ll be listening to eight poets over the course of the next two weeks and writing a letter to one of them.

 

Today, you’re going to try your hand at writing a cinquain.  Can you guess how many lines it is?

Here’s the format:

5 lines

Most common rhyme schemes: ababb, abaab or abccb.

Pretty straightforward, and you can play around with the rhyme scheme.  Take, for example, Edgar Allen Poe’s cinquain, “To Helen:”

Helen, thy beauty is to me
Like those Nicean barks of yore,
That gently, o’er a perfumed sea,
The weary, way-worn wanderer bore
To his own native shore.

Here’s one I wrote.

As always, have fun writing!

Once you craft one you like, transfer it into your poem book.

Day #16: Oulipo

DP #34: Dear Poet #2

Today, we’re going to watch and listen to an eminent American poet recite original poetry. Be prepared to write down your reactions after listening, as well as discuss.

You’ll be listening to eight poets over the course of the next two weeks and writing a letter to one of them.

 

Today, you’re going to try your hand at writing a oulipo poem. These are some of my favorite forms. Here’s how you do it: you start with a line that is one word long, then you write a line that is two words long, then you write a line that is three words long, and so on. The poem can be as long as you like. Here are some I’ve written.

Once you craft one you like, transfer it into your poem book.

Day #15: Renga

DP #33: Dear Poet #1

Today, we’re going to watch and listen to an eminent American poet recite original poetry. Be prepared to write down your reactions after listening, as well as discuss.

You’ll be listening to eight poets over the course of the next two weeks and writing a letter to one of them.

 

Today, we’re going to write renga poetry! It originated in Japan hundreds of years ago and is all about collaborative writing.  You will each start your own renga poem in your notebooks, then pass it around for others to add on to.  The spirit of renga poetry is in getting inspired by each other’s words.

Here we go!

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STEP ONE: In your own notebooks, write the first stanza of a renga poem.

Requirements:
*3 Lines
*Total of 17 syllables

Example:
Sniffle, sniffle, cough:
A class symphony,
Performed with noses and mouths

Take five minutes.

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STEP TWO: Pass your notebooks clockwise within your small groups.

Read the first stanza of the poem in the notebook in front of you.

Write the second stanza of the poem.

Requirements:
*2 Lines
*Each line is 7 syllables (total of 14 syllables)

Example:
One timid musician starts,
Her nose a runny fountain.

Take five minutes.

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STEP THREE: Pass your notebooks clockwise within your small groups.

Read the first and second stanza of the poem in the notebook in front of you.

Write the third stanza of the poem.

Requirements:
*3 Lines
*Total of 17 syllables

Example:
A more brazen boy follows,
His nose a trumpet,
Daring to be heard.

Take five minutes.

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STEP FOUR: Pass your notebooks clockwise within your small groups.

Read the first three stanzas of the poem in the notebook in front of you.

Write the fourth stanza of the poem.

Requirements:
*2 Lines
*Each line is 7 syllables (total of 14 syllables)

Example:
Several join in the chorus,
Coughing and sniffling with might.

Take five minutes.

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Return your four stanza renga poem back to its original owner. After you read it, transfer it into your poem book.

Day #12: Terza Rima

DP #28: Poem of the Day

Read the poem of the day thoughtfully. Then, write a response to it. Your response can be an explanation of what it means, a focus on a particular line you like, or it could be the inspiration for your own creative response in the form of a poem, story, or memory. The key is to let the poem inspire you to write.

Take ten minutes. Be prepared to share with the class.

 

Terza Rima is a poetic rhyme structure used by the famous poet, Dante Alighieri.  Terza stands for “three” which means every stanza is comprised of three lines.  The key is that the stanzas created are interlocked by their rhyme pattern.

aba bcb cdc ded efe

 

Try writing a poem in terza rima.  Once you’re happy with your poem, write it in your poem book on day twelve. Consider posting it on your blog as well!

 

Weekend Ideas:

*Write a free verse about what you did over the weekend.

*Create a found poem from words found in your house.

*Ask a family member to name an object and then create a concrete poem based around it.

*What other ideas do you have?