Poetry: Haiku and Tanka

Daily Prompt #45:  Abecedarian

I want you to try your hand at writing an Abecedarian poem.  These poems use the alphabet to start every line.  Here’s one I wrote.  

Take fifteen minutes.

Today, you’re going to practice writing haiku and tanka poems. These poems come from ancient Japan and place an emphasis on brevity, often focusing on a single image. The key is to remember the following structure for each:

Haiku: click here for samples on my blog.

They are always three lines long and follow this syllabic structure:

5 – 7 -5

This means the first line has five syllables, the second line has seven syllables, and the third line has five syllables.


 

Tanka: click for samples on my blog.

They are always three lines long and follow this syllabic structure:

5 – 7 -5 – 7 – 7

Use the remainder of the hour to write several haiku and tanka. Consider creating a collection tied by a similar theme or image.

Feel free to re-explore the other forms we’ve tried out this week too!

 

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Abecedarian Poetry

DP #50: Title Poem

Pay homage to your favorite books, movies, or poems by writing a title poem.  Feel free to combine favorite titles to create unique poetry.

Take ten minutes.

Today, I want you to try (alone or with a partner) your hand at writing an Abecedarian poem.  These poems use the alphabet to start every line.  Here’s one I wrote.  

If you’re not sure what to write about, I recommend an Abecedarian advice poem.  The Enlightened Narrator over at Short Story Utopia gave me the idea!

Before you leave, I also want to show you your poetry blog assignment on Google Classroom.

Abecedarian Poetry

Daily Prompt

WN #39: Title Poem

Pay homage to your favorite books, movies, or poems by writing a title poem.  Feel free to combine favorite titles to create unique poetry.

Take ten minutes.

Today, I want you to try (alone or with a partner) your hand at writing an Abecedarian poem.  These poems use the alphabet to start every line.  Here’s one I wrote.  

If you’re not sure what to write about, I recommend an Abecedarian advice poem.  The Enlightened Narrator over at Short Story Utopia gave me the idea!

Reminders for Thursday:

  • don’t forget to carry a poem in your pocket (and share it with others!)
  • bring a poem you’re willing to share with the class tomorrow
  • decide if you’re willing to be videotaped discussing and reading your poem tomorrow
  • bring food, drink, or supplies if you signed up to do so
  • finish the NaPoWriMo challenge (tomorrow is the last day and you will be awarded your prize!)