Book Reviews (a practice in brevity)

Daily Prompt #5: Inspiration

Write about what inspires you. Be as specific as you can, writing in either list or paragraph form.

Take five minutes.

 

 

Writing Goals

Before we start talking about writing goals, let’s talk about what you’re already good at as a writer. In your notebook, write down 1-3 aspects of writing you feel you have strength in. We’ll brainstorm some ideas now to get you thinking.

Okay, now let’s talk about what want to improve upon: your writing goals for the semester. What are they? Why have them? How can you create useful ones?

Once you come up with them, write down your goals on the inside of your notebook cover, and be prepared to share one.


Keeping with our theme of the importance of reading this week, particularly reading like a writer, we are going to write book reviews. We are also going to practice the art of brevity because they have to be short – 100 words or less!

First, let’s talk about what makes a well-written review and what makes a poorly written review.

Now let’s practice together. Read the longer review I provide, then in groups, find a way to cut it down to 100 words (or less!). Write the review on white boards. We will share with the class.

 

Now, write your own. Once we get our blogs up and running, this book review will become your first blog post, so make sure to write it in your notebook so you don’t lose it!  I also recommend getting a GoodReads account and posting book reviews on there. It’s a great social networking site for readers!

 

 

 

 

 

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First Day: Welcome!

Welcome to our class blog, students!

While I take attendance, please respond to the following on a post-it note:

Why I Write

It’s optional whether you put your name on it, but you will be sharing it with the class.

 

In case you ever need to access it quickly, here is our syllabus.

Here is a copy of my parent letter as well.

 

Grab a new post-it and be sure to put your name on it. Then, answer the following question:

How do you like to receive positive praise?

We’ll talk about what I mean by that. 🙂

 

Remember, everyone needs a writer’s notebook by Thursday and signed parent/student contracts are due next Tuesday.

Here’s to a great semester of writing!

 

“You MUST read this book!”

Good afternoon class!

To get you brainstorming about books that have affected you, start filling out the handout, “If I Were a Bookshelf.” We’ll place these in the classroom so you can inspire your peers to read your favorite books. Because being an avid reader is so important to being a great writer.

We are also going to create a contract for the class.  We will all be signing it.

Don’t forget your journals tomorrow, so we can officially start writing!

 

Writing Goals and Reading like a Writer

Daily Prompt #6: Catharsis 

Catharsis – the process of releasing, and thereby providing relief from, strong or repressed emotions.

It’s time to unleash any thoughts you have about the week or upcoming weekend.

Write for 7 minutes about anything you need to get off your chest.  The goal is to write the entire time.

Before we start talking about writing goals, let’s talk about what you’re already good at as a writer. On a post-it note, put your name and 1-3 aspects of writing you feel you have strength in. We’ll brainstorm some ideas now to get you thinking.

Okay, now let’s talk about what want to improve upon: your writing goals for the semester. What are they? Why have them? How can you create useful ones?

Once you come up with them, write down your goals on the inside of your notebook cover, and be prepared to share one.


 

One of the best ways to get inspired to write is by reading the works of writers. Let’s talk about what it means to read like a writer.

Now, let’s practice this concept by analyzing the first lines of several books.


With the time remaining, write as many “first lines” as you can for potential stories, trying a few difference techniques (for example, describing setting, dialogue, sharing statistics, plot details).

 

 

 

“You MUST read this book!”

Good morning class!

To get you brainstorming about books that have affected you, start filling out the handout, “If I Were a Bookshelf.” Don’t worry about getting overly detailed. It’s just meant to get you thinking.

Now that you’ve had some time to brainstorm, on a post-it note, write down the number one book you feel everyone simply MUST read. Write down the title, author, and one sentence explaining why. We’ll be posting these in the room to give others reading ideas.

We are also going to create a contract for the class.  We will all be signing it tomorrow.

 

Writing Goals and Reading like a Writer

Daily Prompt #5: 

Catharsis – the process of releasing, and thereby providing relief from, strong or repressed emotions.

It’s time to unleash any thoughts you have about the week or upcoming weekend.

Write for 7 minutes about anything you need to get off your chest.  The goal is to write the entire time.

Before we start talking about writing goals, let’s talk about what you’re already good at as a writer. On a post-it note, put your name and 1-3 aspects of writing you feel you have strength in. We’ll brainstorm some ideas now to get you thinking.

Okay, now let’s talk about what want to improve upon: your writing goals for the semester. What are they? Why have them? How can you create useful ones?

Tomorrow, you will be sharing your writing goals with the class. Come prepared by writing them down.

One of the best ways to get inspired to write is by reading the works of writers. Let’s talk about what it means to read like a writer.

Now, let’s practice this concept by analyzing the first lines of several books.