DAY #5: Concrete Poetry

DP #28: Poem of the Day

Read the poem of the day thoughtfully. Then, write a response to it. Your response can be an explanation of what it means, a focus on a particular line you like, or it could be the inspiration for your own creative response in the form of a poem, story, or memory. The key is to let the poem inspire you to write.

Take ten minutes. Be prepared to share with the class.

 

Try writing a concrete poem with a shape which compliments its message or topic.

Once you’re happy with your poem, draw it in your poem book on day five. Consider taking a picture and posting it on your blog as well!

Weekend Ideas:

*Write a free verse about what you did over the weekend.

*Create a found poem from words found in your house.

*Ask a family member to name an object and then create a concrete poem based around it.

*What other ideas do you have?

 

 

DAY #4: Found Poetry (playlists or book lines)

DP #27: Poem of the Day

Read the poem of the day thoughtfully. Then, write a response to it. Your response can be an explanation of what it means, a focus on a particular line you like, or it could be the inspiration for your own creative response in the form of a poem, story, or memory. The key is to let the poem inspire you to write.

Take ten minutes. Be prepared to share with the class.

 

Today, you’re going to use your phones to create a FOUND poem created from your favorite song lyrics!

Another option is to use the classroom books and pull lines that you like.

Just like yesterday, the key is that you don’t add any new words to the poem. Work with what you gathered.

Once you’re happy with your poem, write it in your poem book on day four. You may also choose to cut the words out of your writer’s notebook and glue them into your poem book. Consider posting it on your blog as well!

 

 

DAY #3: Found Poetry (around the school)

DP #26: Poem of the Day

Read the poem of the day thoughtfully. Then, write a response to it. Your response can be an explanation of what it means, a focus on a particular line you like, or it could be the inspiration for your own creative response in the form of a poem, story, or memory. The key is to let the poem inspire you to write.

Take ten minutes. Be prepared to share with the class.

 

Today, we’re going to talk around the school so you can collect words and phrases in your writer’s notebook.

When we return to class, take the words you gathered and turn them into an original FOUND poem. The poem can take any form you like. The key is that you don’t add any new words to it. Work with what you gathered.

Once you’re happy with your poem, write it in your poem book on day three. You may also choose to cut the words out of your writer’s notebook and glue them into your poem book. Consider posting it on your blog as well!

 

 

DAY #2: Free Verse Poetry

DP #25: Poem of the Day

Read the poem of the day thoughtfully. Then, write a response to it. Your response can be an explanation of what it means, a focus on a particular line you like, or it could be the inspiration for your own creative response in the form of a poem, story, or memory. The key is to let the poem inspire you to write.

Take ten minutes. Be prepared to share with the class.

 

Today, we’re going to talk about a very popular form of poetry: free verse. What is free verse?

Free verse is one of my favorite forms. Here are several I’ve written on my own blog to give you an idea of how open-ended (and freeing) this style of poetry can be.

For practice, you’re going to model a free verse poem after a very famous modern poem titled, “The Red Wheelbarrow.”

Let’s chat about it.

Here’s my free verse poem inspired by it: “So Much”

Let’s chat some more. I’ll share with you my inspiration behind it so you can see how much meaning can lie beneath a poem’s surface.

Now, it’s time for you to write your own poem inspired by “The Red Wheelbarrow.”

Draft your ideas in your writer’s notebook. When you like what you have, write your final draft on Day #2 of your poem book. I encourage you to post it on your blog as well!

 

 

Free Verse Poetry

DP #41: Poetic Emotions

Write down an emotion – any at all – at the top of your page. This will serve as the title for a poem you’re now going to write.

Don’t overthink it.  Just write all the ways you can think of to represent this emotion. Consider figurative and concrete language as you write. This doesn’t have to rhyme or have any specific structure. You can consider it a free write if that helps.

Write for ten minutes.

 

Today, we’re going to talk about a very popular form of poetry: free verse. What is free verse?

Free verse is one of my favorite forms. Here are several I’ve written on my own blog to give you an idea of how open-ended (and freeing) this style of poetry can be.

For practice, you’re going to model a free verse poem after a very famous modern poem titled, “The Red Wheelbarrow.”

Let’s chat about it.

Here’s my free verse poem inspired by it: “So Much”

Let’s chat some more. I’ll share with you my inspiration behind it so you can see how much meaning can lie beneath a poem’s surface.

Now, it’s time for you to write your own poem inspired by “The Red Wheelbarrow.”

Go for it!  Hopefully, some of you will share and even post it on your blog. If you do, please share a link to it in the comments on today’s post.

 

Oulipo Poetry

DP #44: Oulipo Poems

There are many different types of Oulipo poems, which are mathematical in nature.  One of the easiest forms to try is the “Snowball.”  There are two versions.

Version One: Write a poem in which each line gets progressively one word longer (first line is one word, second line is two words, third line is three words, etc.)  Here’s one I wrote.

Version Two: Write a poem where, within each line, the words get progressively longer (example: I am far from happy Mother reduced)

Want a challenge?  Click here for “N+7” approach.

Let’s do some sharing out about your free verse poetry from yesterday.

With the time remaining, write some more free verse. We can generate some topic starters, if needed. Play around with punctuation. Use enjambment. Consider the emotion you’re trying to convey.

Before you leave, here’s our poem of the day.

 

 

 

 

Free Verse Poetry

DP #43: Acrostic Poems

A highly structured poem is the acrostic.  Take a word, write it vertically, and then use the letters to form lines.  Here’s an example from my blog: Your Teacher Writes Too.

Play around for ten minutes.

Today, we’re going to talk about a very popular form of poetry: free verse. What is free verse?

Let’s have a little fun.  We’re all going to write a free verse poem about the following:

 

APPLE

 

Take five minutes and start crafting a free verse poem about this.  The key is not to over think it when you start. Here are some suggestions to help get you started (if you need it):

  • consider topics that you are passionate about
  • start writing down images, thoughts, and ideas you associate with the topic
  • play around with punctuation and cutting off lines without any punctuation
  • play around with the length of your poem’s lines
  • how does the form and structure of your poem enhance the meaning?

Be prepared to share with your tables and with the class.

Try writing a free verse poem (or two or three) during the remainder of class.

And before you leave, here’s our poem-of-day.