Dear Poet Project and Oulipo Poetry

DP #41: Phone Number Poem

Try writing a ten-line poem, using your phone number to guide how many syllables each line should have.

Take ten minutes.


Today, we’re going to watch and listen as four more eminent American poets recite their original poetry. Be prepared to write down your reactions after hearing each one.

 


For the remainder of the hour, I want you to make spine poetry with your peers. Grab some books (either your own or from our class bookshelves) and create poetry! Take a picture and post it on your blog! Be prepared to share your spine poetry to the class.

Here’s an example of what it could look like:

Example #1

Example #2

Advertisements

Poetry: Oulipo and Concrete

DP #34: Oulipo Poems

I want you to try your hand at writing a oulipo poem. These are some of my favorite forms. Here’s how you do it: you start with a line that is one word long, then you write a line that is two words long, then you write a line that is three words long, and so on. The poem can be as long as you like. Here are some I’ve written.

Play around for fifteen minutes.

Use the remainder of the hour to write what is called a concrete poem. It’s a poem whose visual structure represents the content in some way. Here are some examples.   You may create one in your notebook or use plain paper.

As always, happy writing!

Oulipo Poetry

DP #44: Oulipo Poems

There are many different types of Oulipo poems, which are mathematical in nature.  One of the easiest forms to try is the “Snowball.”  There are two versions.

Version One: Write a poem in which each line gets progressively one word longer (first line is one word, second line is two words, third line is three words, etc.)  Here’s one I wrote.

Version Two: Write a poem where, within each line, the words get progressively longer (example: I am far from happy Mother reduced)

Want a challenge?  Click here for “N+7” approach.

Let’s do some sharing out about your free verse poetry from yesterday.

With the time remaining, write some more free verse. We can generate some topic starters, if needed. Play around with punctuation. Use enjambment. Consider the emotion you’re trying to convey.

Before you leave, here’s our poem of the day.

 

 

 

 

Oulipo Poetry and Old School (memoir)

Daily Prompt

WN #32: Oulipo Poetry

There are many different types of Oulipo poems, which are mathematical in nature.  One of the easiest forms to try is the “Snowball.”  There are two versions.

Version One: Write a poem in which each line gets progressively one word longer (first line is one word, second line is two words, third line is three words, etc.)  Here’s one I wrote.

Version Two: Write a poem where, within each line, the words get progressively longer (example: I am far from happy Mother reduced)

Want a challenge?  Click here for “N+7” approach.

Today, we’re going to read some of the memoir, Old School by Tobias Wolff.  As you read, write down questions you have for the author in your “Reading Like a Writer” section of your notebook.  You might actually get the chance to ask the author next week!

Before you leave, here’s our poem-of-day.

 

 

 

Oulipo Poetry

Daily Prompt WN #19: Catharsis

Take a few minutes to write about whatever’s on your mind.  Don’t over think it.  Just write.

Did you know that Math and English can work side by side to create poetry?  It’s called Oulipo.

There are two kinds: “N+7” and “Snowball.”

“N+7”

(you’ll need a dictionary for this one)

Look up your favorite poem and write it in your notebook.

Underline all of the nouns in the poem.

For each noun, look it up in the dictionary, then replace it with the noun appearing seven words away.  Be sure that the noun is a completely new noun and not merely a form of the original.

Be sure to replace the nouns in the title as well.

 

“Snowball”

Version One: Write a poem in which each line gets progressively one word longer (first line is one word, second line is two words, third line is three words, etc.)

Version Two: Write a poem where, within each line, the words get progressively longer (example: I am far from happy Mother reduced)

 

Decide which one you’d like to try in class today and give it a go.  You may work alone or team up with someone in class.

Be prepared to share your work with the class.