Poem/Writer’s Reflection (Post #9) Due

Hi folks!

Today post #9 is due. It is a summative assessment and should include a poem and writer’s reflection. All the details are on Google Classroom. Once you post, be sure to fill out the rubric on there, then click, “Turn In.”  It’s due by midnight Sunday.

If you get done early, use the time to read your peers’ works!

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Found Poetry (around the school)

DP #44: Ode

An ode is a poem that glorifies a person, place, or thing. It does not have any set structure or rhythm and can be both serious or humorous. What is something or someone you really value?

Take ten minutes.

Today, we are going to be taking a walking tour of the school so you can create a “Found” poem. Take photos and jot down words and phrases and punctuation that catches your eye.

Tomorrow, you will be writing a poem created from the words you have collected.

Final Poetry Assignment and NaPoWriMo Awards

DP #43: Acrostic

Try your hand at writing an acrostic poem.

Take ten minutes.


Let’s talk about the game plan for this week:

  1. First, you have your next summative assessment due this Sunday by midnight: a poem with a writer’s reflection.
  2. Chalk Poetry day: this Wednesday! You need to write an original poem and turn it in for approval by the end of the class tomorrow.

Use the remainder of the hour to:

  • look through your notebook to determine which poem you’d like to write outside with chalk. Copy it to a note card for approval. You can write an entirely new one as well.
  • look through your notebook to determine which poem you’d like to work on and post this Friday. You can also create an entirely new one.

 

Crafting a Letter to a Poet

Daily Prompt #42: Color Poem

Try your hand at writing a color poem using the provided handout as a guide.

Take ten minutes.

Now that you’ve watched 9 poets read their work, it’s time to select the one you were most intrigued by.

Let’s figure out who you want to write to and get into groups based on that. From there, you can discuss the poem and start to determine what you might like to say to the poet.  Can you identify the poet’s voice?  What lines spoke to you and why?  Do you share any similarities with the poet?  What questions do you have?

As a class, let’s determine what these letters should look like, including what to avoid.

Tomorrow we’ll be in the lab so you can type your letters and email them to the poets.

Here are the specific guidelines:

Have at least two of your peers read over your letter before emailing to ensure there are no grammatical or spelling errors.

Your letter must contain your name, the name of the poet you’re writing to, and our school name and address (see this sample letter template)

The formal address to include in your letter is Academy of American Poets, 75 Maiden Lane, Suite 901, New York, NY 10038

You may choose to type your letter directly in the email or attach it as a pdf.

Send your letter to dearpoet@poets.org

“CC” your teacher on your email to ensure you get credit (mirandakeskes@hartlandschools.us) OR
(kathleenhoerauf@hartlandschools.us)

Complete this assignment by Sunday night (April 29th). It cannot be turned in late for credit.

If there’s time today, you can feel free to play around with any of the poetic styles we learned about this week or start crafting your letter.

 

 

 

Dear Poet Day 3

DP #41: Haiku Book Reviews

Think about one of your favorite books and write a review for it in haiku form.

Take ten minutes. Be prepared to share. You ALL will. 🙂


Today, we’re going to watch and listen as the final three eminent American poets recite their original poetry. Be prepared to write down your reactions after hearing each one.


For the remainder of the hour, I want you to write any sort of poem you want! Review your notebook for ideas.

Dear Poet Project and Spine Poetry

DP #40: Phone Number Poem

Try writing a ten-line poem, using your phone number to guide how many syllables each line should have.

Take ten minutes.


Today, we’re going to watch and listen as four more eminent American poets recite their original poetry. Be prepared to write down your reactions after hearing each one.

 


For the remainder of the hour, I want you to make spine poetry with your peers. Grab some books (either your own or from our class bookshelves) and create poetry! Take a picture and post it on your blog! Be prepared to share your spine poetry to the class.

Here’s an example of what it could look like:

Example #1

Example #2