Writing Goals and Reading like a Writer

Daily Prompt #7: Inspiration

Write about what inspires you. Be as specific as you can, writing in either list or paragraph form.

Take five minutes.

Before we start talking about writing goals, let’s talk about what you’re already good at as a writer. In your notebook, write down 1-3 aspects of writing you feel you have strength in. We’ll brainstorm some ideas now to get you thinking.

Okay, now let’s talk about what want to improve upon: your writing goals for the semester. What are they? Why have them? How can you create useful ones?

Once you come up with them, write down your goals on the inside of your notebook cover, and be prepared to share one.


One of the best ways to get inspired to write is by reading the works of writers. Let’s talk about what it means to read like a writer.

Now, let’s practice this concept by analyzing the first lines of several books.


With the time remaining, write as many “first lines” as you can for potential stories, trying a few difference techniques (for example, describing setting, dialogue, sharing statistics, plot details).

 

 

 

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Writing Goals and Reading like a Writer

Daily Prompt #6: Catharsis 

Catharsis – the process of releasing, and thereby providing relief from, strong or repressed emotions.

It’s time to unleash any thoughts you have about the week or upcoming weekend.

Write for 7 minutes about anything you need to get off your chest.  The goal is to write the entire time.

Before we start talking about writing goals, let’s talk about what you’re already good at as a writer. On a post-it note, put your name and 1-3 aspects of writing you feel you have strength in. We’ll brainstorm some ideas now to get you thinking.

Okay, now let’s talk about what want to improve upon: your writing goals for the semester. What are they? Why have them? How can you create useful ones?

Once you come up with them, write down your goals on the inside of your notebook cover, and be prepared to share one.


 

One of the best ways to get inspired to write is by reading the works of writers. Let’s talk about what it means to read like a writer.

Now, let’s practice this concept by analyzing the first lines of several books.


With the time remaining, write as many “first lines” as you can for potential stories, trying a few difference techniques (for example, describing setting, dialogue, sharing statistics, plot details).

 

 

 

Writing Goals and Reading like a Writer

Daily Prompt #5: 

Catharsis – the process of releasing, and thereby providing relief from, strong or repressed emotions.

It’s time to unleash any thoughts you have about the week or upcoming weekend.

Write for 7 minutes about anything you need to get off your chest.  The goal is to write the entire time.

Before we start talking about writing goals, let’s talk about what you’re already good at as a writer. On a post-it note, put your name and 1-3 aspects of writing you feel you have strength in. We’ll brainstorm some ideas now to get you thinking.

Okay, now let’s talk about what want to improve upon: your writing goals for the semester. What are they? Why have them? How can you create useful ones?

Tomorrow, you will be sharing your writing goals with the class. Come prepared by writing them down.

One of the best ways to get inspired to write is by reading the works of writers. Let’s talk about what it means to read like a writer.

Now, let’s practice this concept by analyzing the first lines of several books.

 

 

 

Oulipo Poetry and Old School (memoir)

Daily Prompt

WN #32: Oulipo Poetry

There are many different types of Oulipo poems, which are mathematical in nature.  One of the easiest forms to try is the “Snowball.”  There are two versions.

Version One: Write a poem in which each line gets progressively one word longer (first line is one word, second line is two words, third line is three words, etc.)  Here’s one I wrote.

Version Two: Write a poem where, within each line, the words get progressively longer (example: I am far from happy Mother reduced)

Want a challenge?  Click here for “N+7” approach.

Today, we’re going to read some of the memoir, Old School by Tobias Wolff.  As you read, write down questions you have for the author in your “Reading Like a Writer” section of your notebook.  You might actually get the chance to ask the author next week!

Before you leave, here’s our poem-of-day.

 

 

 

Reading like a Writer

Daily Prompt #24:  Catharsis

Write about whatever’s on your mind right now.

Write for five minutes.

Today is the last built-in day to read your current novel.  Book reviews are due this Friday, so the remainder of the week will be spent learning how to write a review.

Something you’ll have to identify in your review of the book is the writer’s style.  As you read, think about adjectives you could use to describe the style.  The list of terms I’m providing can help steer you in the right direction.  I recommend you attach it somewhere in your notebook.

After reading, flip to the reader’s section of your notebook.  Then, decide on one or two words that best describe the style and then explain why you think that. Discussing sentence structure, punctuation, characterization, plot, and other elements can all help you determine what a writer’s style is.

Happy reading!

Reading like a Writer

Daily Prompt #22:  Inspired by an Image

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Photo Credit: funny-pics-fun.com

Try your hand at caption writing today.  Write as many captions as you can in five minutes, incorporating as many types of punctuation as you can.

Be prepared to share.

Today is another chance to enjoy reading your novel and analyzing it as only a writer can.

Today’s focus is on – you guessed it – punctuation and syntax.

As you read, be mindful of how the author writes structurally.  What types of sentences?  What types of punctuation? What’s the frequency?  Do you see any mistakes?  Do they seem purposeful, or are they an example of poor editing? Use your cheat sheets this week as a guide.

After reading, open up your journals to your “reading like a writer” section.  Take a few minutes to write a reflection of your observations.  How do the author’s syntactical and punctuation choices create a style for the author and how would you define it?  As always, be prepared to discuss.

Happy reading!

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Sorry. I couldn’t resist.

 

Reading like a Writer

Daily Prompt #18:  Considering yourself as a character

Guess what?  There’s going to be a book written about you!  What’s the title?  
Come up with at least one idea that you think each of the following people would suggest.

* Yourself
* Your mom (or dad or guardian: your choice)
* Your best friend
* Your worst enemy (or someone who doesn’t really care for you or someone who doesn’t really know you)
* Your pet (or your favorite toy or possession)

Today is another chance to enjoy reading your novel and analyzing it as only a writer can.

Today’s focus is on character development.  In the reading section of your journal, write the name of the character you want to track in your reading.

As you read, keep track of how the author develops the character.  Do they rely on imagery?  Other characters’ perceptions?  Dialogue?  Character voice?  Jot down specific examples and page numbers.

Happy reading!