Renga and Found Poems

DP #46: Renga Poetry

Renga poetry, which originated in Japan hundreds of years ago, is all about collaborative writing.  You will each start your own renga poem in your notebooks, then pass it around for others to add on to.  The spirit of renga poetry is in getting inspired by each other’s words.

Here we go!

—————————————————————————————

STEP ONE: In your own notebooks, write the first stanza of a renga poem.

Requirements:
*3 Lines
*Total of 17 syllables

Example:
Sniffle, sniffle, cough:
A class symphony,
Performed with noses and mouths

Take five minutes.

—————————————————————————————

STEP TWO: Pass your notebooks clockwise within your small groups.

Read the first stanza of the poem in the notebook in front of you.

Write the second stanza of the poem.

Requirements:
*2 Lines
*Each line is 7 syllables (total of 14 syllables)

Example:
One timid musician starts,
Her nose a runny fountain.

Take five minutes.

—————————————————————————————

STEP THREE: Pass your notebooks clockwise within your small groups.

Read the first and second stanza of the poem in the notebook in front of you.

Write the third stanza of the poem.

Requirements:
*3 Lines
*Total of 17 syllables

Example:
A more brazen boy follows,
His nose a trumpet,
Daring to be heard.

Take five minutes.

—————————————————————————————

STEP FOUR: Pass your notebooks clockwise within your small groups.

Read the first three stanzas of the poem in the notebook in front of you.

Write the fourth stanza of the poem.

Requirements:
*2 Lines
*Each line is 7 syllables (total of 14 syllables)

Example:
Several join in the chorus,
Coughing and sniffling with might.

Take five minutes.

—————————————————————————————

Return your four stanza renga poem back to its original owner.

 

For the remainder of the hour, you are going to finish your Found poems, crafted from words you found in the school.

At the very end of class, we’ll do a gallery walk to view each other’s poetry.

Found “in the school” Poems and Renga Poems

DP #48: One Word

Write down one word. Whatever comes to your mind.

That’s it!  Short daily prompt today.

Today, we’re going to do a gallery walk of our Found poetry from around the school and have a class discussion. I’m excited to see what the class created!


Okay, let’s play with Renga poetry the remainder of the hour.  Renga poetry, which originated in Japan hundreds of years ago, is all about collaborative writing.  You will each start your own renga poem in your notebooks, then pass it around for others to add on to.  The spirit of renga poetry is in getting inspired by each other’s words.

Here we go!

———————————————————————————————————————-

STEP ONE: In your own notebooks, write the first stanza of a renga poem.

Requirements:
*3 Lines
*Total of 17 syllables

Example:
Sniffle, sniffle, cough:
A class symphony,
Performed with noses and mouths

Take five minutes.

———————————————————————————————————————-

STEP TWO: Pass your notebooks clockwise within your small groups.

Read the first stanza of the poem in the notebook in front of you.

Write the second stanza of the poem.

Requirements:
*2 Lines
*Each line is 7 syllables (total of 14 syllables)

Example:
One timid musician starts,
Her nose a runny fountain.

Take five minutes.

———————————————————————————————————————–

STEP THREE: Pass your notebooks clockwise within your small groups.

Read the first and second stanza of the poem in the notebook in front of you.

Write the third stanza of the poem.

Requirements:
*3 Lines
*Total of 17 syllables

Example:
A more brazen boy follows,
His nose a trumpet,
Daring to be heard.

Take five minutes.

————————————————————————————————————————-

STEP FOUR: Pass your notebooks clockwise within your small groups.

Read the first three stanzas of the poem in the notebook in front of you.

Write the fourth stanza of the poem.

Requirements:
*2 Lines
*Each line is 7 syllables (total of 14 syllables)

Example:
Several join in the chorus,
Coughing and sniffling with might.

Take five minutes.

—————————————————————————————————————————

Renga poetry can go back and forth as long as you wish.  Eventually though, it needs a clear ending with a couplet.

 

Don’t forget your important homework assignment: bring an item from home for “Show and Tell” tomorrow. It can be ANYTHING (school-appropriate, of course).

Found, Cento and Renga Poetry

DP #45: Found Poetry

Try writing a found poem from the words in your own writer’s notebook!  Pull words, phrases, and sentences you used and combine them to create an entirely new poem.

Take ten minutes.

Similar to a Found poem, a cento poem consists of lines from other poets connected to create an entirely new poem. Here’s an example of one I wrote from my students’ blogs last semester.

I challenge you to write a cento poem from your peers’ blogs and then share it with them!  This could be a fun option for the blog post due tomorrow.

Okay, let’s play with Renga poetry today.  Renga poetry, which originated in Japan hundreds of years ago, is all about collaborative writing.  You will each start your own renga poem in your notebooks, then pass it around for others to add on to.  The spirit of renga poetry is in getting inspired by each other’s words.

Here we go!

———————————————————————————————————————-

STEP ONE: In your own notebooks, write the first stanza of a renga poem.

Requirements:
*3 Lines
*Total of 17 syllables

Example:
Sniffle, sniffle, cough:
A class symphony,
Performed with noses and mouths

Take five minutes.

———————————————————————————————————————-

STEP TWO: Pass your notebooks clockwise within your small groups.

Read the first stanza of the poem in the notebook in front of you.

Write the second stanza of the poem.

Requirements:
*2 Lines
*Each line is 7 syllables (total of 14 syllables)

Example:
One timid musician starts,
Her nose a runny fountain.

Take five minutes.

———————————————————————————————————————–

STEP THREE: Pass your notebooks clockwise within your small groups.

Read the first and second stanza of the poem in the notebook in front of you.

Write the third stanza of the poem.

Requirements:
*3 Lines
*Total of 17 syllables

Example:
A more brazen boy follows,
His nose a trumpet,
Daring to be heard.

Take five minutes.

————————————————————————————————————————-

STEP FOUR: Pass your notebooks clockwise within your small groups.

Read the first three stanzas of the poem in the notebook in front of you.

Write the fourth stanza of the poem.

Requirements:
*2 Lines
*Each line is 7 syllables (total of 14 syllables)

Example:
Several join in the chorus,
Coughing and sniffling with might.

Take five minutes.

—————————————————————————————————————————

Renga poetry can go back and forth as long as you wish.  Eventually though, it needs a clear ending with a couplet.

Finally, here’s the poem-of-the-day.

Found, Cento and Renga Poetry

DP #33: Found Poetry

Try writing a found poem from the words in your own writer’s notebook!  Pull words, phrases, and sentences you used and combine them to create an entirely new poem.

Take ten minutes.

Similar to a Found poem, a cento poem consists of lines from other poets connected to create an entirely new poem. Here’s an example of one I wrote from my students’ blogs last semester.

I challenge you to write a cento poem from your peers’ blogs and then share it with them!  Post your poems in the comments below so I can be sure to read them as well.

Okay, let’s play with Renga poetry today.  Renga poetry, which originated in Japan hundreds of years ago, is all about collaborative writing.  You will each start your own renga poem in your notebooks, then pass it around for others to add on to.  The spirit of renga poetry is in getting inspired by each other’s words.

Here we go!

———————————————————————————————————————-

STEP ONE: In your own notebooks, write the first stanza of a renga poem.

Requirements:
*3 Lines
*Total of 17 syllables

Example:
Sniffle, sniffle, cough:
A class symphony,
Performed with noses and mouths

Take five minutes.

———————————————————————————————————————-

STEP TWO: Pass your notebooks clockwise within your small groups.

Read the first stanza of the poem in the notebook in front of you.

Write the second stanza of the poem.

Requirements:
*2 Lines
*Each line is 7 syllables (total of 14 syllables)

Example:
One timid musician starts,
Her nose a runny fountain.

Take five minutes.

———————————————————————————————————————–

STEP THREE: Pass your notebooks clockwise within your small groups.

Read the first and second stanza of the poem in the notebook in front of you.

Write the third stanza of the poem.

Requirements:
*3 Lines
*Total of 17 syllables

Example:
A more brazen boy follows,
His nose a trumpet,
Daring to be heard.

Take five minutes.

————————————————————————————————————————-

STEP FOUR: Pass your notebooks clockwise within your small groups.

Read the first three stanzas of the poem in the notebook in front of you.

Write the fourth stanza of the poem.

Requirements:
*2 Lines
*Each line is 7 syllables (total of 14 syllables)

Example:
Several join in the chorus,
Coughing and sniffling with might.

Take five minutes.

—————————————————————————————————————————

Renga poetry can go back and forth as long as you wish.  Eventually though, it needs a clear ending with a couplet.

Before you leave, I want to remind you that today is the deadline for the Creative Communications poetry contest.  Please consider submitting a poem.

And finally, here’s the poem-of-the-day.

Class Renga Poem

Below are the first three lines of a Renga poem by yours truly.  🙂

Add the next stanza in the comments below and earn five extra credit points.

Make sure to read all previous comments before adding your own to ensure the structure of the Renga poem remains intact.

You have until next Monday night to add a stanza.  I will read the entire poem in class next Tuesday.

I hope you all contribute!

Renga Structure- alternating stanzas of the following:

Stanza One:
Three Lines (17 syllables total)

Stanza Two:
Two Lines (7 syllables each for a total of 14 syllables)

(Keep going back and forth between these two types of stanzas)

Standing Alone:

A Tantalizing Trepidation of the

Unknown.

Poetry Week (Day One: Renga)

WN 17: Inspired by Literature

“Road Warriors” by Charles Wright 

After hearing the poem, write down your immediate thoughts.  Don’t over think it.  Just write.  See where the words of this poem take you.

We haven’t giving each other “Pats-on-the-Back” in awhile.  Anyone willing to share something they really liked that they’ve read recently from your peers?

Let’s play with Renga poetry today.  Renga poetry, which originated in Japan hundreds of years ago, is all about collaborative writing.  I’m going to number you off 1-7.  This will give us groups of 3.  Together, teams of three will construct THREE original Renga poems simultaneously in class today.

Here we go!

———————————————————————————————————————-

STEP ONE: In your own notebooks, write the first stanza of a renga poem.

Requirements:
*3 Lines
*Total of 17 syllables

Example:
Sniffle, sniffle, cough:
A class symphony,
Performed with noses and mouths

Take five minutes.

———————————————————————————————————————-

STEP TWO: Pass your notebooks clockwise within your small groups.

Read the first stanza of the poem in the notebook in front of you.

Write the second stanza of the poem.

Requirements:
*2 Lines
*Each line is 7 syllables (total of 14 syllables)

Example:
One timid musician starts,
Her nose a runny fountain.

Take five minutes.

———————————————————————————————————————–

STEP THREE: Pass your notebooks clockwise within your small groups.

Read the first and second stanza of the poem in the notebook in front of you.

Write the third stanza of the poem.

Requirements:
*3 Lines
*Total of 17 syllables

Example:
A more brazen boy follows,
His nose a trumpet,
Daring to be heard.

Take five minutes.

————————————————————————————————————————-

STEP FOUR: Pass your notebooks clockwise within your small groups.

Read the first three stanzas of the poem in the notebook in front of you.

Write the fourth stanza of the poem.

Requirements:
*2 Lines
*Each line is 7 syllables (total of 14 syllables)

Example:
Several join in the chorus,
Coughing and sniffling with might.

Take five minutes.

—————————————————————————————————————————-

Renga poetry can go back and forth as long as you wish.  Eventually though, it needs a clear ending with a couplet.

EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY: I have posted the first stanza to a Renga poem on this blog.  In the comments, add the next stanza, keeping in mind the strict line and syllabic structure.  You may add only one stanza, and the opportunity to add will remain open for the next week (I will read the results of our class poem next Tuesday).  If you add an original stanza to our class poem, you will get FIVE EXTRA CREDIT POINTS.  Be sure to read all of the comments to ensure you are keeping the flow of the poem consistent.

I’d love to see all of you contribute.  Happy writing!