Day #8: Limericks

DP #29: Poem of the Day

Read the poem of the day thoughtfully. Then, write a response to it. Your response can be an explanation of what it means, a focus on a particular line you like, or it could be the inspiration for your own creative response in the form of a poem, story, or memory. The key is to let the poem inspire you to write.

Take ten minutes. Be prepared to share with the class.

 

 

This week’s focus in on highly structured poetry.  To help you write one, we’re going to discuss how rhythm, meter, and rhyme affect a poem.

Now, try your hand at writing a highly structured poem called a limerick.

The general structure is this:

5 lines (1st, 2nd, and 5th are longer, 3rd and 4th are shorter)

Rhythm: anapestic

Ryhme Scheme: aabba

Often humorous and bawdy (but don’t have to be)

 

Here’s one I wrote.

It’s not easy.  Take a stab at it.  When you get it right, transfer it into your poem book and consider posting it on your blog!

 

Idea for tomorrow: 

Write a poem (free, found, concrete, or limerick) that shares the emotions you feel about testing (either before or after the test).

 

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Limericks and a Crash Course in rhythm, meter, and rhyme

DP #46: Fear

Freewrite for five minutes about what you fear.

 


This week’s focus in on highly structured poetry.  To help you write one, we’re going to discuss how rhythm, meter, and rhyme affect a poem.

Now, try your hand at writing a highly structured poem called a limerick.

The general structure is this:

5 lines (1st, 2nd, and 5th are longer, 3rd and 4th are shorter)

Rhythm: anapestic

Ryhme Scheme: aabba

Often humorous and bawdy (but don’t have to be)

Here’s one I wrote.

It’s not easy.  Take a stab at it.  If you like it, post it on your blog!

 

 

Limericks and a Crash Course in rhythm, meter, and rhyme

Daily Prompt

WN #34: Fear

Freewrite for five minutes about what you fear.

To start class, we’re going to watch three different poets read one of their poems to us.   After each poet reads, you’ll be writing down your initial reactions.

You’ll watch five more poets read this week.  On Friday, you will conducting a formal email to one of them sharing your response to their work.  Select the poet who resonates most with you and let them know why.

In May, selected student letters will be published on the Academy of American Poets website and a lucky few will receive a direct response from the poet.


This week’s focus in on highly structured poetry.  To help you write one, we’re going to discuss how rhythm, meter, and rhyme affect a poem.

Now, try your hand at writing a highly structured poem called a limerick.

The general structure is this:

5 lines (1st, 2nd, and 5th are longer, 3rd and 4th are shorter)

Rhythm: anapestic

Ryhme Scheme: aabba

Often humorous and bawdy (but don’t have to be)

Here’s one I wrote.

It’s not easy.  Take a stab at it.  If you like it, post it on your blog!