Creative Essays: Voice (Detail, Imagery)

Daily Prompt #13: Hypothetical Situations

You are told you have only one more day to live.

What do you do?

Write your response as a narrative. Use first person point of view and describe the day, rather than simply listing what you’d wish for. Use dialogue if you want.

Write for ten minutes.

By now, you all hopefully have your topic for your creative essay, as well as a working rough draft.

Let’s work on ways to incorporate more detail and imagery now. You may not use everything you write today in your final draft, but even one additional sentence full of imagery can enrich your piece.


Consider the setting of your essay.

Take ten minutes and describe it in great depth, including the five senses (see, hear, taste, touch, smell).

Be prepared to share.


Consider the main character of your essay (it’s probably you!)

Take minutes and describe the character in great depth, including both physical and mental attributes.

Be prepared to share.


Spend the remainder of the hour reading your rough draft again and finding creative ways to incorporate some of the imagery you developed today.

Creative Essays: Voice (Diction and Tone)

Daily Prompt #12: Worst Moment

Even though it may be difficult, write about one of the worst moments of your life. Be as detailed as you can.

Write for eight minutes.

As you continue working on your creative essays, it’s important to consider what tone you want to send. Are you trying to be humorous? Serious? Witty? Sarcastic? Inspiring? Are the words you’re selecting helping create this tone?

Let’s discuss what tone is.

Spend the remainder of class working on your prewriting/rough draft of your creative essay. Don’t stress or overthink it; it’s a rough draft. If you are still struggling with an idea for what to write about, please let me know: I can help!

 

 

 

 

Creative Essays: Voice (Syntax)

Daily Prompt #11: Punctuation Social Personalities

Consulting the “Punctuation Social Personalities” handout, decide which type of punctuation best matches you and your personality.  You can pick more than one.

For example, here’s how I’d describe my personality using punctuation:

– ! ? ; ! –

Now, write about.  You can choose the STYLE you want to write in (consult your handout from yesterday for ideas). It’s your personality; you decide.

Write for ten minutes.

Punctuation is a powerful way of getting your voice across in your writing. Consider what a piece with many exclamation points is saying versus a piece with lots of hyphens.

Choose your punctuation wisely, and use it correctly.

Yesterday, I reviewed the elements of writing you have control over to create your own unique voice. Today, we’re going to focus on one of them: syntax (i.e. sentence structure).

Generally speaking, sentences can be broken down into three categories:

simple

compound

complex

The types of sentences you choose to use directly affect the voice you’re creating in your writing.

On the top of a fresh sheet of paper in your writer’s notebook, write a simple sentence. For example,

The girl cried softly.

Now, take the sentence you just wrote, and make it a compound sentence. For example,

The girl cried softly, but the little boy didn’t notice.

Now, take the sentence you just wrote, and make it a complex sentence. For example,

The girl cried softly as the little boy continued playing with his trucks.

Reflect on your own writing. Do you tend to use a certain type of sentence or do you vary them? What kind of sentence do you prefer and why?

Let’s look at the essays again. Pick one and label (identify) the types of sentences the author uses. Look for patterns. Does anything stand out to you? How are they using syntax (sentence structure) to help create voice and get a point across?

With the time remaining, start writing down ideas for your creative essay. What do you care about? What thoughts and ideas do you want to share with others?

 

Creative Essays: Style and Voice

Daily Prompt #10: 

What do you care about?

Write for eight minutes.

 

Let’s check out the rubric for the creative essay assignment, as well as three contest opportunities.

In this class, you’re going to continually work on crafting your style and voice. This assignment is the first step.

But what is the difference between style and voice?

For the remainder of the hour, brainstorm ideas for your essay, including which contest you would like to enter!