Fiction and Point of View

Daily Prompt

WN #13: Rereading and Highlighting

You’ve written 12 entries in your notebook now.  It’s time to comb back through it.  Take a highlighter, pen, and/or pencil and begin rereading.  As you do, mark words, phrases, or ideas you had that you find interesting.  Feel free to write new thoughts and ideas in the margins.

For today’s entry, write a brief reflection on how you view your writing so far.  Are you noticing any patterns?  Can you identify your writer’s voice yet?  What do you see as your strengths?  Use these questions as spring boards for exploring your writing persona.

Take 15 minutes.

Now it’s time to start breaking down the elements of what makes fiction effective.  We’re going to play around today with a generic scenario, then write about it from different points of view to see how that changes the story.

Let’s brainstorm a few ideas for basic scenarios.  Then, we’ll branch out into different points of view to tell the story.

Be prepared to share your work.

Before you go, be aware of a contest Cromaine Library is hosting.  It’s a great chance to showcase your writing talent and maybe win some cash!

 

 

Flash Fiction Workshop

Daily Prompt

WN #12:  Flash Fiction

Read the following piece of flash fiction written by your peer.

“What is it like to breathe?”     ~natalia renee solis

Incorporate this line into your own short piece of fiction.  It could be the first line, in the middle, or the last line. It’s up to you.

Write for ten minutes.

Hi class!  Let’s start by discussing the authors’ techniques from your reading yesterday.

For the remainder of class, I’m going to continue conferencing with students.

As I do, you should work on writing a more polished piece of flash fiction (typically no more than 700 words).

Consider having a peer read it and give you feedback.

Consider posting it on your blog tomorrow.

If you’re not feeling the flash fiction bug, write something else.  As long as you’re writing, you’re using time wisely.

Remember we are meeting in lab 300 tomorrow.  Your first graded post will be due.  Directions will be provided tomorrow on how to submit.

Happy writing!

 

 

 

Flash Fiction: Day Two

Daily Prompt

WN 10: Two-sentence story.   Similar to six-word stories, the focus is on brevity and diction, but you have little more leeway with these.

Here’s a couple of spooky samples taken from a website with lots more:

I woke up to hear knocking on glass. At first, I thought it was the window until I heard it come from the mirror again.

She asked why I was breathing so heavily.  I wasn’t.

Okay, try making your own two-sentence story now.  It doesn’t have to be scary.

Consider sharing it in the comments to this post!

Okay folks, it’s our first workshop day.  I’m pumped!  While I am conferencing with students individually, these are your options:

* write a 25-WORD story

* write in your writer’s notebook about anything in any form

* work on a post for your blog

* read a great book

* help a fellow writer with his/her writing

In case of writer’s block, I’ve found a really cool plot generator that you can use to get a story going, using provided basic plot elements.  If you don’t have a phone, feel free to use the Smartboard to generate a plot for yourself.

Feel free to post any of your flash fiction today on Twitter with the hashtag #keskesflashfiction as well.

Okay, happy writing/reading!

 

Workshop Day: Playwriting (Day Four)

Daily Prompt

WN #42: Writing from an Image

absurd set

This is an actual set for a play.  What do you imagine the script would be like for a play like this?  Freewrite for ten minutes, exploring your thoughts and ideas about this set.

The end of the marking period is…tomorrow!

I need all of you to rate yourselves on your participation.  Take out your Progress Tracker Packets and fill out the section about participation for marking period 2.  Turn those into me today so I can review them and input the grades.

As always, be honest (with me, and with yourself).

Now, while I am conferencing with students individually, these are your options:

* work on writing your own ten-minute play (write something entirely new or take a piece you’ve already written and convert it)

* work on a post for your blog (remember to post your book review if you haven’t yet)

* read a great book

* help a fellow writer with his/her writing

Okay, happy writing/reading!

 

Workshop Day: Playwriting (Day Two)

Daily Prompt

WN #40: Writing from a List

Make a list of moments from your own life which could be interesting to see onstage.

Write for five minutes.

Let’s continue yesterday’s discussion about plays.  Today, we’re going to specifically focus on structure.

For those interested, I have another 10-minute sample script for one actress called, “The Serpent’s Tale.”

Now, while I am conferencing with students individually, these are your options:

* work on writing your own ten-minute play (write something entirely new or take a piece you’ve already written and convert it)

* work on a post for your blog (remember to post your book review if you haven’t yet)

* read a great book

* help a fellow writer with his/her writing

Okay, happy writing/reading!

 

Workshop Day

Daily Prompt

WN #35: Story Starter

You take a sip from your drink and feel different. That may be because your torso has an extra arm protruding from it. Another sip, another arm. Then a wing. What happens if you finish the drink?
(from Reader’s Digest writing prompts)

Free write for five minutes.

Let’s check out the latest edition of our chain story!

While I am conferencing with students individually, these are your options:

* work on writing your own movie script (write something entirely new or take a piece you’ve already written and convert it)

* work on a post for your blog

* read a great book

* help a fellow writer with his/her writing

* remember your third graded blog post is due this Friday.

Okay, happy writing/reading!

 

Workshop Day

Daily Prompt

WN #33: What is most important to you?

Free write for seven minutes, exploring this question.

Let’s continue yesterday’s discussion about movie scripts and their structure.

Now, while I am conferencing with students individually, these are your options:

* work on writing your own movie script (write something entirely new or take a piece you’ve already written and convert it)

* work on a post for your blog

* read a great book

* help a fellow writer with his/her writing

* remember your third graded blog post is due this Friday.

Okay, happy writing/reading!