Final Project: Online Literary Journal

DP #62: Writing Advice

Read the provided handout with quotes from published writers. When you’re done, write down some writing advice of your own and be prepared to share with the class.

Hi folks!  It’s time to talk about the final exam project for this class: your submission to our online literary journal.

Here are the directions on how to do the final project.  You’ll all be submitting to our online literary journal, Et Cetera.

We will be meeting in various labs for the remainder of the semester, including exam day.

Let me show you, step-by-step, how to submit your final piece which is due NEXT MONDAY (June 12th) by the end of the hour.

 

 

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Poetic Forms: the Sonnet

DP #39: Laughter

Free write for five minutes about what makes you laugh.

 

Today, you’re going to try your hand at writing a sonnet, arguably the most popular form of poetry in the world.  There are several types, but we’re going to focus on the ever-popular Shakespearean sonnet.

Here’s a handout to help guide you through the process. Take the rest of the hour to try writing one.

 

Happy writing!

 

 

Poetic Forms: Terza Rima and Cinquains

Daily Prompt #38: Terza Rima

Terza Rima is a poetic rhyme structure used by the famous poet, Dante Alighieri.  Terza stands for “three” which means every stanza is comprised of three lines.  The key is that the stanzas created are interlocked by their rhyme pattern.

aba bcb cdc ded efe

Take ten minutes and try crafting a few lines using this format.  If you enjoy it, use class time today to craft a well-polished piece.

Today, you’re going to try your hand at writing a cinquain.  Can you guess how many lines it is?

Here’s the format:

5 lines

Most common rhyme schemes: ababb, abaab or abccb.

Pretty straightforward, and you can play around with the rhyme scheme.  Take, for example, Edgar Allen Poe’s cinquain, “To Helen:”

Helen, thy beauty is to me
Like those Nicean barks of yore,
That gently, o’er a perfumed sea,
The weary, way-worn wanderer bore
To his own native shore.

Here’s one I wrote.

As always, have fun writing!

 

Limericks and a Crash Course in rhythm, meter, and rhyme

DP #36: Catharsis

You’ve just had a three-day weekend. Take five minutes to write about how you spent it!  🙂

This week’s focus in on highly structured poetry.  To help you write one, we’re going to discuss how rhythm, meter, and rhyme affect a poem.

Now, try your hand at writing a highly structured poem called a limerick.

The general structure is this:

5 lines (1st, 2nd, and 5th are longer, 3rd and 4th are shorter)

Rhythm: anapestic

Ryhme Scheme: aabba

Often humorous and bawdy (but don’t have to be)

Here’s one I wrote.

It’s not easy.  Take a stab at it.  If you like it, post it on your blog!

 

 

Fiction: Peer-editing

Daily Prompt #32: Writing from a Word

RAIN

What comes to your mind when you see this word?

Write for five minutes.

Today, you’re going to have your peers help you improve your fiction piece.


 

All of you will receive a peer editing form. Staple this to the front of your rough draft. If your fiction piece is on an electronic device, make sure the paper travels with it.

The sheet has a front and back side. The front side is for editor #1 and the back side is for editor #2. Have two different students read your fiction piece.

The more serious you take this, the more beneficial it will be.

When you are done, use the time remaining to read the editors’ comments, ask questions, and fine tune your rough drafts.

 

 

 

 

Fiction: Dialogue

Daily Prompt #29: How many ways can you rewrite a sentence?

Take a sentence from the rough draft of your fiction piece and rewrite it at the top of this entry.

NOW, rewrite this sentence five times in five different ways.  You can add words, delete words, or take an entirely new angle.  The key is to start recognizing how much time you can spend crafting the perfect sentence.

Be prepared to share with your peers.

Today, I want to make sure you know how to write dialogue correctly.  Dialogue can be a powerful tool when writing fiction, especially when it sounds authentic.

 

With the time remaining, continue working on your rough drafts. Tomorrow will be your last day in class to work on them.

Happy writing!