Poetic Forms: the Villanelle

DP #43: Fear

What are you afraid of? Write for five minutes. This can be great fodder for poetry!

Hi folks!

Today, you’re going to try one of my favorite types of structured poems: the villanelle.

Here’s one I wrote.

This handout will help you write your own. Give it a try!

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Limericks and a Crash Course in rhythm, meter, and rhyme

DP #42: Catharsis

Take five minutes to write about whatever’s on your mind today. Unleash your emotions on paper!

 

This week’s focus in on highly structured poetry.  To help you write one, we’re going to discuss how rhythm, meter, and rhyme affect a poem.

Now, try your hand at writing a highly structured poem called a limerick.

The general structure is this:

5 lines (1st, 2nd, and 5th are longer, 3rd and 4th are shorter)

Rhythm: anapestic

Ryhme Scheme: aabba

Often humorous and bawdy (but don’t have to be)

 

Here’s one I wrote.

It’s not easy.  Take a stab at it.  If you like it, post it on your blog!

 

 

Flash Fiction: Day Two

Daily Prompt #24:

I write because I can’t sleep.   ~ Ben Mezrich

Write for seven minutes on this six-word story. See where it takes you.

Today, we’re going to study and write two-sentence stories.   Similar to six-word stories, the focus is on brevity and diction, but you have a little more leeway.

Here’s a couple of spooky samples taken from a website:

I woke up to hear knocking on glass. At first, I thought it was the window until I heard it come from the mirror again.

She asked why I was breathing so heavily.  I wasn’t.


 

Okay, try making your own two-sentence stories now.  It doesn’t have to be scary.


 

From the ones you wrote, pick your favorite two-sentence story and write in on a post-it note. Post it on our board.


 

Now, grab a post-it and stick it in your notebook. Underneath, write a short story inspired by it!


 

 

 

 

Flash Fiction: Day One

Daily Prompt #23: Inspired by Images

Photo courtesy of Pixabay

 

For the next month and a half, our focus will be on writing fiction. First, we will be focusing specifically on flash fiction. This will help us to start thinking of ideas for National Novel Writing Month in November!

Because of its brevity, flash fiction requires you to write perfectly and precisely.  It’s a great way to fine tune your skills!

Today, we’ll look at six-word stories.   Here’s a classic example by Ernest Hemingway:

For sale: baby shoes, never worn.

In your notebooks, write down the “story” hidden inside this piece of flash fiction.

Let’s discuss.

Let’s look at a few more examples.

Now, write your own!


 

Trade notebooks.  Write your reactions to another person’s six-word story in his/her notebook.  What is the hidden story you see?


 

Take your favorite six-word story and consider how you could develop it into a longer piece. How could you expand on the plot and develop the characters?

 

 

 

Screenwriting: Day Two

Daily Prompt #15: Responding to Music

Listen to the following song. Feel free to write as you listen (or just listen!)

Hi folks!

Let’s review the handouts: Building Blocks of a Script and Formatting a Script.

Next, practice formatting a short scene from Toy Story with a partner.

Google Docs also has a script Add-on. Let’s play with it a little bit!

Let’s check to see if you’ve got it!

Creative Essays: Crunch Time!

Daily Prompt #12: Rereading and Higlighting

Take some time to pore over your notebook (you’ve got 11 entries now, plus extra writing you may have added). Add notes in the margins of your notebook and highlight words, phrases, and lines that jump out to you. Add on to prompts you feel inspired to finish.

After you’ve done this, write a brief reflection on what you’ve written so far. Are you surprised by anything? Are you finding any patterns? Are you starting to discover your writer’s voice already?

Reread, highlight, and write for fifteen minutes.

 

Today’s goal is to complete your creative essay rough draft.  Rough drafts are due tomorrow.

Let’s review the assignment on Google Classroom.

 

 

Creative Essays: an Introduction

DP #7: 

Describe one of the best days of your life. Be as detailed as you can, focusing on only one moment.

Write for eight minutes.

Today, marks our first writing unit: creative essays.

Before we get any farther, let’s answer this question: what is an essay?

To get a better understanding of what a creative essay can look like, we’re going to read seven sample creative essays and begin defining what makes an essay effective or ineffective.

As  you read through the packet, jot down the following in your notebook for the three essays you feel were most effective:

  • Name of essay
  • What is it about? (in a sentence)
  • Favorite line from it
  • What you like about it (what makes it effective?)

Be prepared to discuss.