Screenwriting: Day Two

Daily Prompt #15: Responding to Music

Listen to the following song. Feel free to write as you listen (or just listen!)

Hi folks!

Let’s review the handouts: Building Blocks of a Script and Formatting a Script.

Next, practice formatting a short scene from Toy Story with a partner.

Google Docs also has a script Add-on. Let’s play with it a little bit!

Let’s check to see if you’ve got it!

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Creative Essays: Crunch Time!

Daily Prompt #12: Rereading and Higlighting

Take some time to pore over your notebook (you’ve got 11 entries now, plus extra writing you may have added). Add notes in the margins of your notebook and highlight words, phrases, and lines that jump out to you. Add on to prompts you feel inspired to finish.

After you’ve done this, write a brief reflection on what you’ve written so far. Are you surprised by anything? Are you finding any patterns? Are you starting to discover your writer’s voice already?

Reread, highlight, and write for fifteen minutes.

 

Today’s goal is to complete your creative essay rough draft.  Rough drafts are due tomorrow.

Let’s review the assignment on Google Classroom.

 

 

Creative Essays: an Introduction

DP #7: 

Describe one of the best days of your life. Be as detailed as you can, focusing on only one moment.

Write for eight minutes.

Today, marks our first writing unit: creative essays.

Before we get any farther, let’s answer this question: what is an essay?

To get a better understanding of what a creative essay can look like, we’re going to read seven sample creative essays and begin defining what makes an essay effective or ineffective.

As  you read through the packet, jot down the following in your notebook for the three essays you feel were most effective:

  • Name of essay
  • What is it about? (in a sentence)
  • Favorite line from it
  • What you like about it (what makes it effective?)

Be prepared to discuss.

 

Book Reviews (a practice in brevity)

Daily Prompt #5: Inspiration

Write about what inspires you. Be as specific as you can, writing in either list or paragraph form.

Take five minutes.

 

 

Writing Goals

Before we start talking about writing goals, let’s talk about what you’re already good at as a writer. In your notebook, write down 1-3 aspects of writing you feel you have strength in. We’ll brainstorm some ideas now to get you thinking.

Okay, now let’s talk about what want to improve upon: your writing goals for the semester. What are they? Why have them? How can you create useful ones?

Once you come up with them, write down your goals on the inside of your notebook cover, and be prepared to share one.


Keeping with our theme of the importance of reading this week, particularly reading like a writer, we are going to write book reviews. We are also going to practice the art of brevity because they have to be short – 100 words or less!

First, let’s talk about what makes a well-written review and what makes a poorly written review.

Now let’s practice together. Read the longer review I provide, then in groups, find a way to cut it down to 100 words (or less!). Write the review on white boards. We will share with the class.

 

Now, write your own. Once we get our blogs up and running, this book review will become your first blog post, so make sure to write it in your notebook so you don’t lose it!  I also recommend getting a GoodReads account and posting book reviews on there. It’s a great social networking site for readers!

 

 

 

 

 

Starting your Writer’s Notebook

Welcome students!  It’s time to start creating your writer’s notebook.  To do that, you’re going to engage in a few writing exercises today.  These are strategies we will continually use throughout the semester.

Okay, it’s time to start your first notebook entry.  Here goes…


Daily Prompt (DP) #1:  

On the first page, write your name at the top.  Nickname, full name – you decide.

Underneath it, write whatever you want. Write about the history of your name, the significance of it, what you like/don’t like about it, other people you know with this name, names you wish you had, etc….  Poetry, prose: don’t over think it; just start writing.  You could even draw.

This entry will be an optional one to share.

*Returning Students: imagine your name has been taken away from you and replaced with a number. Explore how that would affect you.


 

DP #2: Writing from a List:

Select your own topic for a list, then make that list.  A list should have at least 5 items.  Give the list a title.

 

Now, pick one of the items on your list and begin free writing about it.  You have five minutes.

This entry will be an optional one to share. 


DP #3: Questions:

Write down a question you have to which you do not know the answer.

 

 

 

 

Now for the fun part!  Pass your notebook to someone sitting next to you and attempt to answer his/her question.  Write your response in his/her notebook.

 

Final Project: Online Literary Journal

DP #62: Writing Advice

Read the provided handout with quotes from published writers. When you’re done, write down some writing advice of your own and be prepared to share with the class.

Hi folks!  It’s time to talk about the final exam project for this class: your submission to our online literary journal.

Here are the directions on how to do the final project.  You’ll all be submitting to our online literary journal, Et Cetera.

We will be meeting in various labs for the remainder of the semester, including exam day.

Let me show you, step-by-step, how to submit your final piece which is due NEXT TUESDAY (June 12th) by the end of the hour.

 

 

Class Chain Story

Daily Prompt #61: Create-a-scenario (given setting)

Create a scenario which takes place in the following setting:

  • Present day, interior of the school cafeteria, Friday night, 11pm

Take ten minutes.

 

We’re going to have some writing fun creating chain stories as a class.

Let’s get in one big circle.

Now, everyone, start by writing a title for your story in your notebooks (you each will have your own).

Pass your notebook to the left. Read the title of the new notebook in your hand, then begin writing.

Whenever I say, “Pass!” you should pass to the left.

By the end of the activity, you will each get your notebooks back, complete with a story created by the class.